detail..detail..detail

Amongst Friends by Lars Hur

Amongst Friends by Lars Hur


Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux (1827-1875) bust La Candeur (“Candor”) marble

Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux (1827-1875) bust La Candeur (“Candor”) marble

tierradentro:

Still Life with Fruit" (details", 1675, Jacob van Walscapelle.

jaded-mandarin:

Peter Paul Rubens. Detail from The Fur, 1636.

jaded-mandarin:

Peter Paul Rubens. Detail from The Fur, 1636.

c0ssette:

Charles Gleyre,Le coucher de Sapho,detail (1840-1860)

c0ssette:

Charles Gleyre,Le coucher de Sapho,detail (1840-1860)

detailsofpaintings:

Pierre-Narcisse Guérin, Morphée et Iris
1811

detailsofpaintings:

Pierre-Narcisse Guérin, Morphée et Iris

1811

anotherboheminan:

(via Treasure Hunt | National Trust Acquisitions)
archaicwonder:

Roman Marble Double Revolving Panel of Dionysos and Satyr with a  Ketos (sea monster), c. 1st-2nd century AD

In Greek mythology, a satyr is one the companions of Dionysus. He is portrayed with goat-like features, including a goat-tail, goat-like ears. As Dionysiac creatures, they are lovers of wine and women, and they are ready for every physical pleasure.

The primary face carved in high relief with two profile heads, the left representing the youthful Dionysos with feminine features and thick luxuriant hair, facing the head of a heavily bearded satyr with furrowed brows, pointed ears and a mass of wavy hair, his beard falling in corkscrew curls, the tips trailing onto the curved throwing stick, ‘pedum’, below, two castanets hang from the stick falling onto the ground-line in the foreground; the reverse carved in low relief with a sea-monster, ‘ketos’, riding atop the waves shown in ridged layers, its head turned back towards its undulating fish-like body with fishy tail, its dog-like muzzle open to show the prominent teeth, with fin-like gills below the jaw, long ears, fins and a crest on the neck and body and lion’s forelegs, set within a recess with a rectangular border, centrally pierced through the top and bottom for rotation.

archaicwonder:

Roman Marble Double Revolving Panel of Dionysos and Satyr with a  Ketos (sea monster), c. 1st-2nd century AD
In Greek mythology, a satyr is one the companions of Dionysus. He is portrayed with goat-like features, including a goat-tail, goat-like ears. As Dionysiac creatures, they are lovers of wine and women, and they are ready for every physical pleasure.
The primary face carved in high relief with two profile heads, the left representing the youthful Dionysos with feminine features and thick luxuriant hair, facing the head of a heavily bearded satyr with furrowed brows, pointed ears and a mass of wavy hair, his beard falling in corkscrew curls, the tips trailing onto the curved throwing stick, ‘pedum’, below, two castanets hang from the stick falling onto the ground-line in the foreground; the reverse carved in low relief with a sea-monster, ‘ketos’, riding atop the waves shown in ridged layers, its head turned back towards its undulating fish-like body with fishy tail, its dog-like muzzle open to show the prominent teeth, with fin-like gills below the jaw, long ears, fins and a crest on the neck and body and lion’s forelegs, set within a recess with a rectangular border, centrally pierced through the top and bottom for rotation.